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Doxa Update and Ask

Like most everyone else, Doxa has never experienced something like the effects of a pandemic. It will be at least a full 2 years before the first US volunteer group comes back to stay and build in Tijuana. A slower than projected return. The only other time in Doxa’s 30-year history that even comes close is 2008, when the effects of Mexican cartel activity and the global financial crisis caused some groups to skip building that year.

Even with the pandemic disruption, Doxa has continued to operate on the ground in Tijuana. Since April 2020, groups and individual donors have funded the building of 39 houses, equipped 117+ scholarship students for distance learning, facilitated limited community events (such as summer camp), and supported Hogar de los Niños and Unidos por Siempre orphanages.

House building fundamentally changed with the creation of two local building teams. Once houses are funded, these teams work with the families to level the site, pour the cement slab, and construct the house. Thankfully, we have been able to build houses for all families that were promised one last year. The wait list continues to grow, though, with no firm dates of when the next houses will be built.

Education has looked different, as well. Equipping all scholarship students for distance learning entailed the purchase of many laptops, tablets, software, and school supplies. It also meant outfitting Hogar de los Niños, Unidos por Siempre, and Doxa with business printers, more tutoring staff, good Internet connections, and supplies. These classrooms function as resource centers to support kids during distance learning.

Thankfully, Doxa has a large property that is mostly undeveloped. This means lots of outdoor space, which has permitted limited community events. Summer camp made a return this year, dance classes have resumed, and every Thursday afternoon people gather to play soccer, volleyball, or kickball. Doxa’s community programs, however, aren’t as active as they once were.

Pre-pandemic, about 1000 people per year came down to Tijuana with Doxa to build houses. These operations and the resulting donors accounted for the majority of Doxa’s revenue. Not only did house building groups have an immensely positive impact on Doxa, but also on Hogar de los Niños and Unidos por Siempre orphanages. The absence of groups has, unfortunately, resulted in a financial toll on Doxa that also has ripple effects to the partner orphanages.

Doxa desires to still be present in the lives of students, families, and both orphanages. To continue the long-term relationships that have been formed over the past 30 years. In order to sustain operations, education scholarships, and community programs Doxa is embarking on a fundraising goal of $175,000. These donations will result in a fully operational education scholarship program, continuation of community events, and retention of all staff through 2022.

We ask that you prayerfully consider supporting Doxa during this time. Here’s how:

Thank you for your years of partnership and together we’ll continue impacting the communities of Tijuana.

What is Doxa? – by Dale & Liz Whitney

If you are reading this newsletter then it is possible you have been to Tijuana and are missing the community there as desperately as we are. We must acknowledge at the outset our deep appreciation for Rosa, our mentor and friend.

Many of you have been asked this question, “So what is Doxa?” If you have been to Tijuana, depending on when you went or with whom, your answers may have varied from house building, day camp, to worshiping in a “thin” place where God seems to be nearer than our world back home. An underlying component of our collective experience is the relationships that have surrounded all of us – teammates, house families, and the orphanages that have hosted us.

For the Whitney’s Doxa is defined by the people and encounters we have had in Tijuana: from brilliant Rosa who believed that education could change a generation, to the house building efforts from donors and builders up and down the West Coast, to Tony and Casa Hogar de Los Niños, to friends like the Tzecs, to our visits to the bodega and materiales store, to the plan for a Community Center in Pedregal, to a new partnership in East Tijuana, and to the students whose career paths were influenced by their time in Tijuana. We have had twenty-five years of shared meals and prayers, celebrations of births, weddings, birthdays & anniversaries, loads of lumber, and gallons of paint. Over two thousand new homes, new opportunities for education, new connections in developing neighborhoods, and a whole lot of lessons about grit and tenacity, this is our Doxa.

The Church in Tijuana Meets the Church in Seattle

For us, friends in Tijuana prayed for our kindergarten Sunday School students, many who grew up to make their own trips to build a house, while we in Seattle prayed for the children we met in Tijuana. How grateful for who they are now and their voices in our lives. (Thank you, Facebook.)

We are also thankful for a congregation in Seattle who believes in each other. They have generously supported house building and education in Tijuana. Dale remembers a little girl sitting amidst the debris in the old dump in Tijuana and to this day, she lingers in his prayers. He says Doxa isn’t just the people who build, but also the people who donate, who pray, and encourage those who are partnering with her family (and families like hers) for something different. We have often been part of an Easter house building trip with high school students and are often struck that the same God who died for us also died for that little girl. Resurrection Sunday.

Liz notes that new home owners in Tijuana have been so supportive of the team members working with them on their homes. For those in Tijuana, they have to own the land – no small feat, and then they are trusting our teams to construct a solid structure. Many of you know the dynamic we are describing. Families providing drinks or treats; asking about the builders, praying for them.

A Part of the Gospel

One father of a new home gave this crucifix to our team, with these powerful words, “Thank you for your part in the Gospel.” The crucifix hangs in the kitchen at the Old Orfa as a reminder of a partnership that we have participated in and one that continues to change lives on both sides of the border.

This is Doxa.

2020 from Andrew, Doxa’s Board Chair

The ministry of Doxa has been around for almost thirty years and continues to grow as God calls us to serve in the many neighborhoods of Tijuana. Over the last year the board and staff took the time to reflect on what the next five, ten and twenty years has in store for Doxa. This was not always an easy process as we were forced to identify our strengths along with our weaknesses, but the results have been rewarding.

We studied our vision, mission and values, which allowed us to refine these key concepts to align with the organization we have grown to be while not losing sight of the core values that were set in place almost thirty ago. The refining of these foundational elements set the stage for us to develop a comprehensive strategic plan for the upcoming years that creates short-term and long-term goals. 

Some of our short-term goals include expanding board membership, fundraising and increased marketing. We have already brought on two new board members and will be looking to grow the board by a few more in the months and year to come. Our fundraising efforts took shape this last spring as our Executive Director, Alex Knopes, led a robust campaign to ensure that houses were still being built even though the pandemic restricted groups from participating in the building of the houses themselves. Through this fundraising we were able to safely employ local labor to complete the houses and provide homes for families that had been waiting. We have also begun to establish fundraising campaigns that will include the Pedregal Community Center and expansion concepts for house building and community outreach in East Tijuana. As we continue to expand our marketing efforts, we encourage all of our supporters to follow us on social media. Please see links below so you can stay up to date on all of these goals as we work hard to push them forward. 

We believe these goals will continue to push us towards our vision and mission. A vision of:

A world in which relational and economic life flourishes, where people are globally compassionate and gain new life by giving theirs away.

Doxa’s Vision

And a mission to:

Create opportunities for people to serve Tijuana through house building, education, and long-term community.

Doxa’s Mission

In all our ministries we are striving to further our vision and mission. We are most excited to see our first community center building take shape in the neighborhood of Pedregal. We are nearing the completion of the plans and will begin to get bids for the construction and strategize the phasing of this capital project. The community center will be designed to support the Tijuana community through child and adult education, providing tutoring programs and community events. Taking a relational and interactive approach will help to form long-term community relationships. It is exciting to see this concept turn towards reality and we look forward to engaging all of our communities on both sides of the border to come alongside as we realize this goal together. 

Remembering Rosa (April 17, 1966 – October 2, 2020) – by James B. Notkin

When we first began to build homes in Colonia Pedregal de Santa Julia the roads were dirt and deeply crevassed, without electricity the sprinkling of houses on the hillsides, were dark at night and every drop of water, whether for cleaning or drinking, was trucked around the neighborhood. Clearly, great change occurred over the last thirty years but one constant was Rosa and her passion to make life better for every person she encountered. 

I first met Rosa in the early 90’s when she came to Hogar de los Niños orphanage and cared for the kids there. Each year about a hundred high school students from our church would travel across the border to build houses and the orphanage was our base of operations. In addition to all her work at the orphanage, which at the time had over seventy children living there, Rosa’s duties included helping out-of-their-depth youth pastors, like me, navigate everything from finding building sites and creating a lumber yard throughout the orphanage to delivering sand and finding a tow-truck for a van teetering over a cliff – all done, regardless of what other mishaps had occurred that day, with graciousness and a brilliant smile. To be honest, I am not sure the smile was good natured restrained laughter at my ineptness or, in the early years when she was learning English, a way of communicating her great support for our endeavors. Either way the smile always helped. 

Over the years the building trips grew larger in size and in number and it became clear to the Doxa (then Homes without Boundaries) leadership team that growth was due in no small part to Rosa. Many short-term missions do more damage than good because of their “hit and run” nature but Rosa’s year-round presence and engagement in the community dovetailed into Doxa’s commitment to return year after year to the same place and built trust in the neighborhood and beyond. Logically, we hired Rosa full time and with that both the community and Doxa became stronger. More specifically, each of us became stronger inspired by her compassion and commitment. 

Most of the teams from the US knew Rosa from the educational offerings like day camps she organized or the house building projects she supported but there was so much more. She was known by multitudes as “la profe.” Others saw her as the unofficial mayor of the region. And for many she attained that mononymous status reserved for Elvis or Prince and was simply Rosa — as in one person saying to another in need, “go see Rosa.” Regardless of her title, Rosa was a force for good. In the movies the good guys wore white hats but in Pedregal they wore bright white sneakers and those white sneakers of Rosa were everywhere: out in Brisa Marina talking to a family about building a house, at the clinic taking a woman with cancer who had no other way to see a doctor, at the community center tutoring, meeting with Zumba instructors to offer classes, in another colonia delivering food and supplies to a woman with disabilities, at the Annex overseeing the delivery of house building materials, or downtown partnering with the City of Tijuana to build three hundred houses further out on the highway where we are still building today. Rosa was a one-person Social Welfare and Housing Agency — and a great one.

More importantly Rosa was Flavio’s beloved and Paola, Esmerelda, and Flavio’s mom. They were her pride and her joy — her eyes dazzling at the mention of them. To each of them I, Doxa and am sure all who benefitted from Rosa’s dedicated work, her sacrifice of evening and weekend time with her family to resolve a visiting group’s crisis, want to say the deepest thank you for sharing the gift of Rosa with us. 

Several years ago, Rosa traveled to Rome and received an audience with Pope John Paul II. As she spoke to me humbly of this joyful experience that affirmed her God-given belovedness, it was profoundly evident this belovedness was the source of the belovedness she poured out to all who met her. Rosa knew she was loved by Jesus and responded with her whole being. Her wisdom and influence permeate Doxa. Being in Tijuana will never be the same without Rosa who has travelled this journey with so many of us. Yet, her influence, example and inspiration remain, encouraging us to dream and persevere in our mission. Jeff Holland, a co-founder of Homes without Boundaries (now Doxa), tells the story of coming back from a tough day of building houses when Rosa, who had brought in a mariachi band came up to him and asked, “Why aren’t you dancing?” Jeff wanted nothing more than to take a bucket shower. But Rosa insisted, “It’s a fiesta. You have to dance.” That’s Rosa. There are always obstacles and heartaches on the road to being a beloved community but it doesn’t mean you don’t keep dancing. Constantly. 

Remembering Rosa

It is with great sadness that we share Rosa Amelia Dominguez Zavala passed away in the early morning hours on Friday, October 2, 2020. She is succeeded by her husband, Flavio, and their children. This news is painful and shocking as we grieve this loss together. 

Rosa had been active in the Tijuana community for almost her entire adult life. She worked with Casa Hogar de los Niños orphanage, Doxa, and the catholic church San Judas Tadeo. Rosa got her start at Hogar de los Niños and became part of the fabric of the neighborhood (Colonia Pedregal de Santa Julia). With Doxa, Flavio shared that Rosa found her passion and really shined. From Doxa’s inception, she was the main person to qualify families for house building. And for more than a decade, Rosa led Doxa’s education and community programming. She dedicated her time to mentoring kids and their parents, whether through the after-school program, summer camp, parenting classes, or special events and clubs. Flavio noted that with Doxa, Rosa had a platform to affect change in her local community which gave her and those around her flourishing life.

We give thanks and continue to be in amazement at all the things God was able to accomplish through Rosa. She touched thousands of lives on both sides of the border. While we will miss her dearly, we know she is in a better place now. Earlier this morning, Flavio and their children shared that they were so grateful for everyone’s friendship, support, hard work, and love. In serving Tijuana together, it has been your love poured out that has made the difference. Rosa saw everyone as part of her family and she always opened her house up to everyone. Her family intends to keep her legacy of that.

Rosa’s burial is scheduled for tomorrow at 10am PDT. While there won’t be any large church gathering, we invite you to join in a moment of prayer at that time for Rosa and her family.

For those who are interested and able, there is a Memorial Fund setup to help with funeral and unexpected family expenses during this time.

Thank you for your continued love and, as Rosa would say, I’m sending you a fuerte abrazo (big hug). 

– Doxa’s Board of Directors & Alex Knopes

Staff Spotlight: Maria Figueroa

If you haven’t met Maria yet, here’s your chance! She is the director of Unidos por Siempre orphanage and Doxa’s house building manager for East Tijuana. Her words and interview below have been translated from Spanish to English. 

My name is Maria Esther Figueroa Torres and my motivation for doing everything I do is my family, love of kids, and becoming a better person every day. I am originally from Tijuana, Baja California and what I like most about this city are the traditions, food, and people that live here. 

How did you learn about working in orphanages? 
Initially, I worked as a volunteer at Hogar de los Niños where I did all sorts of things like work with kids under 5 years old. It was then that my love and interest in working with kids started. 

How did you end up in the Rojo Gomez neighborhood of Tijuana? 
I ended up in that neighborhood because they (local land board) gave me the land to start a soup kitchen and all I had to do was construct a small house. I was already looking for somewhere else to go because of my poor financial situation and domestic violence situation with my husband.

Why did you decide to work with kids and open Unidos por Siempre orphanage? 
Because I thought about my kids growing up, how I had difficulties in providing food and supporting them in their studies. So I thought about helping other kids have better possibilities for school, food, and a dignified life. 

Since you’ve lived in Rojo Gomez, how have you seen the community change? 
I’ve lived here since 2002 and was one of the first people to move here. There have been great changes and I’ve helped to work with the government to build local schools and install running water. Working with Doxa, we’ve been able to provide dignified housing to families. 

What are the primary needs of people in Rojo Gomez? 
The most important needs are quality food, street pavement (or street grading for dirt roads), street lights, and quality houses for families. 

What do you like about your work with Unidos por Siempre?
I like to see the evolution that each child has after receiving the attention, love, and space to live freely. That they are converted into educated professionals that will have a positive impact on their community in the future. I also enjoy seeing how families react in their new houses and the ownership they have. This makes the community better little by little. 

During this time of sheltering in place due to COVID-19, what have you learned about yourself? 
I have learned more about each of the kids at Unidos por Siempre, the ways they live together and develop. My love for them and for this greater work has only continued to grow. I’ve realized that if anything happens to them, it also deeply affects me. 

Before leaving, I’d like to thank God for putting you in my path and for helping Unidos por Siempre unconditionally. I’m thankful for the boost you have provided and knowing that there are people who care about our well-being is invaluable. I send you blessings and hugs from Tijuana.

Update on Doxa’s COVID-19 Response

The deeper we get into 2020, our experience continues to look different than what we all had expected. Doxa has used this crisis-filled time for prayer, evaluation, and innovation. To revisit the ways by which we carry out our mission. Even though it may look a little different, Doxa continues to create impact through house building, education, and community.

For house building, this has meant creating and employing local building teams to construct homes. Many groups and individuals have financially supported the building of houses during this time. It has not only resulted in houses still being built, but also in increased employment opportunities for a community that is experiencing layoffs and reductions in working hours. This “new” way of building houses has opened up an opportunity that Doxa has never seen before. It may also be something that becomes a permanent fixture within Doxa, even after this season of crisis passes.

For education, we have equipped students for distance learning. Instead of investing in school uniforms, Doxa equipped those students to learn from home with laptops and Internet access. Tutors from Doxa’s after-school program also continued to check-in with students and families through WhatsApp or phone calls. Now that the 2019-2020 school year is finished, we have several weeks to catch our breath, strategize, and plan for what Tijuana schools will do next. One thing that we do believe is that there will be an increase in scholarship applicants for the 2020-2021 school year.

For community, we have had to stop all activities and the dance group practices. While we hope to continue those soon, we recognize that safety and health take precedence. For Doxa’s annual summer camp, which routinely draws over 100 children and adults, we have had to delay and augment its implementation. We are planning for a shortened camp, limiting numbers of kids, instigating increased health and sanitizing procedures, and conducting mainly outdoor activities. One of the major needs that summer camp will address is school review. Many students did not absorb or retain the same amount of school lessons as they normally would have.

Back in March, as shelter in place orders were starting to occur around the world, Doxa undertook a spring fundraising campaign. Those goals were to fund 22 houses, raise $7500 for Hogar de los Niños orphanage, and raise $15000 for Unidos por Siempre orphanage. We have been completely blown away as you have helped to exceed these goals. Thank you so much for your generosity! 22 houses have been funded, over $8000 raised for Hogar de los Niños, and over $15000 raised for Unidos por Siempre. A grand total of $164,705 for Tijuana! We can’t thank you all enough for this outpouring of support!

As we transition into summer, the effects of COVID-19 have lasted longer than we originally anticipated. We had thought groups were going to be able to travel again to Tijuana and build houses, school planning would be back to normal, and summer camp would be the joyous laughter-filled time that everyone looks forward to. In the wake of prolonged COVID-19 impacts, this has left even more families without the prospect of a new house. The cost of access to education increases with laptops and Internet requirements. While we are still planning on summer camp, it definitely will look different.

In order to respond to these continued needs, Doxa’s goals for this summer and fall are to fund the building of 20 houses, 50 education scholarships, and $2500 for a modified summer camp. There has already been awesome progress on these new goals!

If you would like to support, donations can be made through Doxa’s secure website and we also have an Amazon List setup for school supplies.

We are so thankful for your prayers and support during this time. It has been breathtaking to see the larger community moved into action, on both sides of the border.

Meet Sam, long-term volunteer in Tijuana

Hi, my name is Sam. I’m 19, I live in Spokane, and this past year I was lucky enough to spend 9 months in Mexico, volunteering with Doxa. I had worked with Doxa twice before during high school, going with my youth group. Those weeks were spent learning about Mexico and how different the culture was. I remember being amazed by how happy people could be with so much less than what I had. That very well may be the only lesson I really remember from those trips, frankly I was a pretty self-centered high schooler and didn’t really think too hard about it. But that one lesson sat in my head for a long time and in November of 2018 I decided to act on it and go down to Mexico right after high school.

Sam and his Dad

When I first arrived in San Diego, Alex took me over the border and helped me move in to Hogar de los Niños. He introduced me to Carmen, the director, and then said something along the lines of “Okay, you have my number. Give me a call if you need anything. See you later.” This was the moment when I realized I wasn’t in Kansas anymore (or a high school in suburban Spokane for that matter.) The following three-month period was quite possibly the hardest time of my life. I was unsure as of where I fit in the culture and struggled to communicate my most basic thoughts. Largely cut off from the support system I had built in Spokane, I was forced to go against my own introversion to varied levels of success. Poor communication skills continued to be a theme right up until my abrupt end in March due to COVID. I got to learn a lot about the lives of the people in Tijuana and how different the city is on the east and west sides. I got to work with orphanage staff and play with kids. Some of my favorite memories are from nightly fútbol games on the helipad at Hogar de los Niños. But weirdly enough, I learned the most working with the various American groups that I served alongside. From high school youth groups to some crazy geezers from Seattle’s U-District, every group had a whole slew of stories from their casts. Every story I heard different and interesting but somehow leading to them coming to serve in Mexico.   This led me to realize that my life isn’t about me. It’s about everyone else. It’s about how I can help a group have a better experience. How the houses I helped build will affect the family I built them with. How my actions factor into other people’s lives and wellbeing.

Sam with U-District Group (top right)

I went down to Mexico to give myself away. Maybe in the name of God or maybe just to run away from my problems. It doesn’t matter. What ended up happening was the most enriching experience of my life. I’ve become much more confident in not only my own abilities but in who I am as a person. I also learned from day 1 that silence is something I take for granted. Considering Hogar de los Niños was almost entirely composed of concrete rectangles, complete silence is something I’ve REALLY come to appreciate. All throughout my schooling I was taught that if I didn’t get good grades and go to a good college then I’d be a total failure in life. Schools fail to tell students that there are other options that are just as good if not better for you than the pursuit of money in a capitalist society just to improve yourself. My time in Mexico flipped that on its head.

If you want to know more about my experience, I’d be more than happy to tell you about it.

Shoot me an email at ssaito23@comcast.net. I’m an open book.

Staff Spotlight: Ely Martinez Salgado

If you haven’t met Ely yet, here’s your chance! She is Doxa’s administrator. Her words and interview below have been translated from Spanish to English.

My name is Elizabeth, but everyone calls me Ely. I’m originally from Morelia, but have lived in Tijuana for almost my entire life. For 12 years I volunteered with World Vision and learned a great deal from that experience. I’ve currently been working 6 years with Doxa and originally came to know Doxa through my son Angel. He was in 2nd grade and needed some more structure around his school work, so I went to inquire about helpful resources. One of my strengths is organization and administration, so Rosa and I make a great team! I’m a fast learner and believe that everyone goes to school to get straight A’s. If we’re not shooting for the best, then why are we here?!?! I strive to be a great mother to my 4 kids, providing the encouragement and love that they need to succeed in their own lives.

From left to right: Jesus, Ely’s mother-in-law, Sofia, Leo, Angel, Ely, and Esteban.

What do you like most about Doxa?
The strong relationship with kids and how their faces light up when they do something they previously thought impossible. I also really like the opportunities that we provide parents, kids, and adolescents to participate in cultural activities, sports, and counseling that isn’t always widely available.

During this time of sheltering in place, what have you learned about yourself and your family?
I have realized that, unfortunately, many times we do not value everything that we have around us. This pandemic came and has paralyzed our lives. Showing us that at any time the world can be taken away and, in the worst cases, our lives can be taken away. I thank God for keeping my children and my loved ones healthy. As a family we have had to really value every meal we have and every peso that we make. Above it all, we see that we are blessed because we all continue to be united at home and that with a little prevention for the future we can make a difference.

How has Doxa helped you and your family?
The help that Doxa has provided is much more than something material or financial. Doxa has helped us to establish rules with our kids, form values and responsibilities, and develop other abilities that we didn’t have as a family. It’s also been the reason why I could continue and finish my high school studies. The opportunity that Doxa has facilitated regarding sports and cultural activities is also something that my family would have grown up without.

Why is Doxa’s work in the neighborhood of Pedregal de Santa Julia important? 
In this community Doxa is more than a couple classrooms, it is where dreams come true. Through the years that I have been working at Doxa, I’ve seen the faces of kids with absolute amazement as they are able to do things they thought they couldn’t, and that their parents thought they would never do on account of not being able to financially support them. Facilitating after-school activities is very important because sometimes the mom and dad have to work and this prevents them to being able to help with their child’s homework.

What does Doxa mean to the surrounding community? 
I think Doxa represents something very important for our community. Doxa has put itself on the line for us and our kids. Over time we have seen those kids grow up and some are now adolescents who are attending college. Doxa has also marked the lives of thousands by bringing the peace and tranquility that a new roof provides.

Dear Doxa Community

Our global community is experiencing the throws of crises on top of crises: a pandemic, systemic racism, movement of refugee populations, natural disasters, political oppression, and others. Too often crises seem far away, distant, or difficult to grasp. 2020 has provided a dose of realism that while crises can strike anywhere around the world, they can also unfold on our front doorstep.

Crises can disrupt our physical world, but also our emotional and spiritual worlds. They bring us opportunities for lament, anger, engagement, change, listening, and learning. The Bible reminds us there is a season for everything, even the uncomfortable things. It is important to embrace and not rush these seasons, lest we carry on in ignorance. That we can fully experience each season with a humble heart focused on wisdom. That on the other side, love will flourish and be sincere, intelligent, and responsible (Philippians 1:9-11).

The pandemic crisis of COVID-19 hit Tijuana hard. In the month of April, hundreds of families all across the city were slated to receive houses by volunteer groups, 22 of those families by way of Doxa. Likewise, Hogar de los Niños and Unidos por Siempre orphanages were expecting hundreds of volunteers to pour through their doors. Of course, neither of these things happened and the future outlook continued to deteriorate. The families, orphanages, and volunteer groups have experienced all degrees of emotions, that their plans and lives were severely impacted.

Thankfully, various churches and individuals took time to understand the situation, empathize across borders, and then act. Choosing to boldly pray and donate, taking an active role in expressing love and reconciling the little they could within the larger COVID-19 crisis. These efforts have resulted in exceeding Doxa’s Spring 2020 Goals! Thank you to everyone who has taken the time to understand this crisis and respond. $164,705 has been raised, which includes funding 22 houses (4 have already been built!), $8k+ for Hogar de los Niños, and $15k+ for Unidos por Siempre! Many prayers, notes, and care packages have also been sent to people all over Tijuana. A reminder to all those we serve that they are not forgotten, even when we can’t see them in person.

Transitioning to Summer and Fall 2020, Doxa’s goals are 20 houses, 50 education scholarships, and to adapt our summer camp experience. We look forward to communicating more about these upcoming goals in the weeks to come.

While Doxa continues to respond in its little corner of the world, I also recognize there are many other crises that fill your time. I sincerely thank you for permitting the people of Tijuana, Doxa, and its partners to occupy a little space in your mind and heart.

With gratitude and grace,
Alex Knopes
Executive Director, Doxa