Archive for ‘News’

Remembering Rosa

It is with great sadness that we share Rosa Amelia Dominguez Zavala passed away in the early morning hours on Friday, October 2, 2020. She is succeeded by her husband, Flavio, and their children. This news is painful and shocking as we grieve this loss together. 

Rosa had been active in the Tijuana community for almost her entire adult life. She worked with Casa Hogar de los Niños orphanage, Doxa, and the catholic church San Judas Tadeo. Rosa got her start at Hogar de los Niños and became part of the fabric of the neighborhood (Colonia Pedregal de Santa Julia). With Doxa, Flavio shared that Rosa found her passion and really shined. From Doxa’s inception, she was the main person to qualify families for house building. And for more than a decade, Rosa led Doxa’s education and community programming. She dedicated her time to mentoring kids and their parents, whether through the after-school program, summer camp, parenting classes, or special events and clubs. Flavio noted that with Doxa, Rosa had a platform to affect change in her local community which gave her and those around her flourishing life.

We give thanks and continue to be in amazement at all the things God was able to accomplish through Rosa. She touched thousands of lives on both sides of the border. While we will miss her dearly, we know she is in a better place now. Earlier this morning, Flavio and their children shared that they were so grateful for everyone’s friendship, support, hard work, and love. In serving Tijuana together, it has been your love poured out that has made the difference. Rosa saw everyone as part of her family and she always opened her house up to everyone. Her family intends to keep her legacy of that.

Rosa’s burial is scheduled for tomorrow at 10am PDT. While there won’t be any large church gathering, we invite you to join in a moment of prayer at that time for Rosa and her family.

For those who are interested and able, there is a Memorial Fund setup to help with funeral and unexpected family expenses during this time.

Thank you for your continued love and, as Rosa would say, I’m sending you a fuerte abrazo (big hug). 

– Doxa’s Board of Directors & Alex Knopes

Staff Spotlight: Maria Figueroa

If you haven’t met Maria yet, here’s your chance! She is the director of Unidos por Siempre orphanage and Doxa’s house building manager for East Tijuana. Her words and interview below have been translated from Spanish to English. 

My name is Maria Esther Figueroa Torres and my motivation for doing everything I do is my family, love of kids, and becoming a better person every day. I am originally from Tijuana, Baja California and what I like most about this city are the traditions, food, and people that live here. 

How did you learn about working in orphanages? 
Initially, I worked as a volunteer at Hogar de los Niños where I did all sorts of things like work with kids under 5 years old. It was then that my love and interest in working with kids started. 

How did you end up in the Rojo Gomez neighborhood of Tijuana? 
I ended up in that neighborhood because they (local land board) gave me the land to start a soup kitchen and all I had to do was construct a small house. I was already looking for somewhere else to go because of my poor financial situation and domestic violence situation with my husband.

Why did you decide to work with kids and open Unidos por Siempre orphanage? 
Because I thought about my kids growing up, how I had difficulties in providing food and supporting them in their studies. So I thought about helping other kids have better possibilities for school, food, and a dignified life. 

Since you’ve lived in Rojo Gomez, how have you seen the community change? 
I’ve lived here since 2002 and was one of the first people to move here. There have been great changes and I’ve helped to work with the government to build local schools and install running water. Working with Doxa, we’ve been able to provide dignified housing to families. 

What are the primary needs of people in Rojo Gomez? 
The most important needs are quality food, street pavement (or street grading for dirt roads), street lights, and quality houses for families. 

What do you like about your work with Unidos por Siempre?
I like to see the evolution that each child has after receiving the attention, love, and space to live freely. That they are converted into educated professionals that will have a positive impact on their community in the future. I also enjoy seeing how families react in their new houses and the ownership they have. This makes the community better little by little. 

During this time of sheltering in place due to COVID-19, what have you learned about yourself? 
I have learned more about each of the kids at Unidos por Siempre, the ways they live together and develop. My love for them and for this greater work has only continued to grow. I’ve realized that if anything happens to them, it also deeply affects me. 

Before leaving, I’d like to thank God for putting you in my path and for helping Unidos por Siempre unconditionally. I’m thankful for the boost you have provided and knowing that there are people who care about our well-being is invaluable. I send you blessings and hugs from Tijuana.

Update on Doxa’s COVID-19 Response

The deeper we get into 2020, our experience continues to look different than what we all had expected. Doxa has used this crisis-filled time for prayer, evaluation, and innovation. To revisit the ways by which we carry out our mission. Even though it may look a little different, Doxa continues to create impact through house building, education, and community.

For house building, this has meant creating and employing local building teams to construct homes. Many groups and individuals have financially supported the building of houses during this time. It has not only resulted in houses still being built, but also in increased employment opportunities for a community that is experiencing layoffs and reductions in working hours. This “new” way of building houses has opened up an opportunity that Doxa has never seen before. It may also be something that becomes a permanent fixture within Doxa, even after this season of crisis passes.

For education, we have equipped students for distance learning. Instead of investing in school uniforms, Doxa equipped those students to learn from home with laptops and Internet access. Tutors from Doxa’s after-school program also continued to check-in with students and families through WhatsApp or phone calls. Now that the 2019-2020 school year is finished, we have several weeks to catch our breath, strategize, and plan for what Tijuana schools will do next. One thing that we do believe is that there will be an increase in scholarship applicants for the 2020-2021 school year.

For community, we have had to stop all activities and the dance group practices. While we hope to continue those soon, we recognize that safety and health take precedence. For Doxa’s annual summer camp, which routinely draws over 100 children and adults, we have had to delay and augment its implementation. We are planning for a shortened camp, limiting numbers of kids, instigating increased health and sanitizing procedures, and conducting mainly outdoor activities. One of the major needs that summer camp will address is school review. Many students did not absorb or retain the same amount of school lessons as they normally would have.

Back in March, as shelter in place orders were starting to occur around the world, Doxa undertook a spring fundraising campaign. Those goals were to fund 22 houses, raise $7500 for Hogar de los Niños orphanage, and raise $15000 for Unidos por Siempre orphanage. We have been completely blown away as you have helped to exceed these goals. Thank you so much for your generosity! 22 houses have been funded, over $8000 raised for Hogar de los Niños, and over $15000 raised for Unidos por Siempre. A grand total of $164,705 for Tijuana! We can’t thank you all enough for this outpouring of support!

As we transition into summer, the effects of COVID-19 have lasted longer than we originally anticipated. We had thought groups were going to be able to travel again to Tijuana and build houses, school planning would be back to normal, and summer camp would be the joyous laughter-filled time that everyone looks forward to. In the wake of prolonged COVID-19 impacts, this has left even more families without the prospect of a new house. The cost of access to education increases with laptops and Internet requirements. While we are still planning on summer camp, it definitely will look different.

In order to respond to these continued needs, Doxa’s goals for this summer and fall are to fund the building of 20 houses, 50 education scholarships, and $2500 for a modified summer camp. There has already been awesome progress on these new goals!

If you would like to support, donations can be made through Doxa’s secure website and we also have an Amazon List setup for school supplies.

We are so thankful for your prayers and support during this time. It has been breathtaking to see the larger community moved into action, on both sides of the border.

Meet Sam, long-term volunteer in Tijuana

Hi, my name is Sam. I’m 19, I live in Spokane, and this past year I was lucky enough to spend 9 months in Mexico, volunteering with Doxa. I had worked with Doxa twice before during high school, going with my youth group. Those weeks were spent learning about Mexico and how different the culture was. I remember being amazed by how happy people could be with so much less than what I had. That very well may be the only lesson I really remember from those trips, frankly I was a pretty self-centered high schooler and didn’t really think too hard about it. But that one lesson sat in my head for a long time and in November of 2018 I decided to act on it and go down to Mexico right after high school.

Sam and his Dad

When I first arrived in San Diego, Alex took me over the border and helped me move in to Hogar de los Niños. He introduced me to Carmen, the director, and then said something along the lines of “Okay, you have my number. Give me a call if you need anything. See you later.” This was the moment when I realized I wasn’t in Kansas anymore (or a high school in suburban Spokane for that matter.) The following three-month period was quite possibly the hardest time of my life. I was unsure as of where I fit in the culture and struggled to communicate my most basic thoughts. Largely cut off from the support system I had built in Spokane, I was forced to go against my own introversion to varied levels of success. Poor communication skills continued to be a theme right up until my abrupt end in March due to COVID. I got to learn a lot about the lives of the people in Tijuana and how different the city is on the east and west sides. I got to work with orphanage staff and play with kids. Some of my favorite memories are from nightly fútbol games on the helipad at Hogar de los Niños. But weirdly enough, I learned the most working with the various American groups that I served alongside. From high school youth groups to some crazy geezers from Seattle’s U-District, every group had a whole slew of stories from their casts. Every story I heard different and interesting but somehow leading to them coming to serve in Mexico.   This led me to realize that my life isn’t about me. It’s about everyone else. It’s about how I can help a group have a better experience. How the houses I helped build will affect the family I built them with. How my actions factor into other people’s lives and wellbeing.

Sam with U-District Group (top right)

I went down to Mexico to give myself away. Maybe in the name of God or maybe just to run away from my problems. It doesn’t matter. What ended up happening was the most enriching experience of my life. I’ve become much more confident in not only my own abilities but in who I am as a person. I also learned from day 1 that silence is something I take for granted. Considering Hogar de los Niños was almost entirely composed of concrete rectangles, complete silence is something I’ve REALLY come to appreciate. All throughout my schooling I was taught that if I didn’t get good grades and go to a good college then I’d be a total failure in life. Schools fail to tell students that there are other options that are just as good if not better for you than the pursuit of money in a capitalist society just to improve yourself. My time in Mexico flipped that on its head.

If you want to know more about my experience, I’d be more than happy to tell you about it.

Shoot me an email at ssaito23@comcast.net. I’m an open book.

Staff Spotlight: Ely Martinez Salgado

If you haven’t met Ely yet, here’s your chance! She is Doxa’s administrator. Her words and interview below have been translated from Spanish to English.

My name is Elizabeth, but everyone calls me Ely. I’m originally from Morelia, but have lived in Tijuana for almost my entire life. For 12 years I volunteered with World Vision and learned a great deal from that experience. I’ve currently been working 6 years with Doxa and originally came to know Doxa through my son Angel. He was in 2nd grade and needed some more structure around his school work, so I went to inquire about helpful resources. One of my strengths is organization and administration, so Rosa and I make a great team! I’m a fast learner and believe that everyone goes to school to get straight A’s. If we’re not shooting for the best, then why are we here?!?! I strive to be a great mother to my 4 kids, providing the encouragement and love that they need to succeed in their own lives.

From left to right: Jesus, Ely’s mother-in-law, Sofia, Leo, Angel, Ely, and Esteban.

What do you like most about Doxa?
The strong relationship with kids and how their faces light up when they do something they previously thought impossible. I also really like the opportunities that we provide parents, kids, and adolescents to participate in cultural activities, sports, and counseling that isn’t always widely available.

During this time of sheltering in place, what have you learned about yourself and your family?
I have realized that, unfortunately, many times we do not value everything that we have around us. This pandemic came and has paralyzed our lives. Showing us that at any time the world can be taken away and, in the worst cases, our lives can be taken away. I thank God for keeping my children and my loved ones healthy. As a family we have had to really value every meal we have and every peso that we make. Above it all, we see that we are blessed because we all continue to be united at home and that with a little prevention for the future we can make a difference.

How has Doxa helped you and your family?
The help that Doxa has provided is much more than something material or financial. Doxa has helped us to establish rules with our kids, form values and responsibilities, and develop other abilities that we didn’t have as a family. It’s also been the reason why I could continue and finish my high school studies. The opportunity that Doxa has facilitated regarding sports and cultural activities is also something that my family would have grown up without.

Why is Doxa’s work in the neighborhood of Pedregal de Santa Julia important? 
In this community Doxa is more than a couple classrooms, it is where dreams come true. Through the years that I have been working at Doxa, I’ve seen the faces of kids with absolute amazement as they are able to do things they thought they couldn’t, and that their parents thought they would never do on account of not being able to financially support them. Facilitating after-school activities is very important because sometimes the mom and dad have to work and this prevents them to being able to help with their child’s homework.

What does Doxa mean to the surrounding community? 
I think Doxa represents something very important for our community. Doxa has put itself on the line for us and our kids. Over time we have seen those kids grow up and some are now adolescents who are attending college. Doxa has also marked the lives of thousands by bringing the peace and tranquility that a new roof provides.

Dear Doxa Community

Our global community is experiencing the throws of crises on top of crises: a pandemic, systemic racism, movement of refugee populations, natural disasters, political oppression, and others. Too often crises seem far away, distant, or difficult to grasp. 2020 has provided a dose of realism that while crises can strike anywhere around the world, they can also unfold on our front doorstep.

Crises can disrupt our physical world, but also our emotional and spiritual worlds. They bring us opportunities for lament, anger, engagement, change, listening, and learning. The Bible reminds us there is a season for everything, even the uncomfortable things. It is important to embrace and not rush these seasons, lest we carry on in ignorance. That we can fully experience each season with a humble heart focused on wisdom. That on the other side, love will flourish and be sincere, intelligent, and responsible (Philippians 1:9-11).

The pandemic crisis of COVID-19 hit Tijuana hard. In the month of April, hundreds of families all across the city were slated to receive houses by volunteer groups, 22 of those families by way of Doxa. Likewise, Hogar de los Niños and Unidos por Siempre orphanages were expecting hundreds of volunteers to pour through their doors. Of course, neither of these things happened and the future outlook continued to deteriorate. The families, orphanages, and volunteer groups have experienced all degrees of emotions, that their plans and lives were severely impacted.

Thankfully, various churches and individuals took time to understand the situation, empathize across borders, and then act. Choosing to boldly pray and donate, taking an active role in expressing love and reconciling the little they could within the larger COVID-19 crisis. These efforts have resulted in exceeding Doxa’s Spring 2020 Goals! Thank you to everyone who has taken the time to understand this crisis and respond. $164,705 has been raised, which includes funding 22 houses (4 have already been built!), $8k+ for Hogar de los Niños, and $15k+ for Unidos por Siempre! Many prayers, notes, and care packages have also been sent to people all over Tijuana. A reminder to all those we serve that they are not forgotten, even when we can’t see them in person.

Transitioning to Summer and Fall 2020, Doxa’s goals are 20 houses, 50 education scholarships, and to adapt our summer camp experience. We look forward to communicating more about these upcoming goals in the weeks to come.

While Doxa continues to respond in its little corner of the world, I also recognize there are many other crises that fill your time. I sincerely thank you for permitting the people of Tijuana, Doxa, and its partners to occupy a little space in your mind and heart.

With gratitude and grace,
Alex Knopes
Executive Director, Doxa

Tijuana Life and COVID-19

As a city, Tijuana has been and will continue to be drastically impacted by COVID-19. We see disruptions to employment, education, orphanages, and in some cases regional mobility. 

The schools in Tijuana have all stopped in-person classes as of several weeks ago and will most likely not return to classroom instruction this academic year. Zoraida, a Tijuana school teacher and assistant principal, says that “over the past few weeks the education system has implemented various platforms such as classes by TV, radio, and digital methods according to each family and their abilities to connect. This school year will continue and all students will automatically pass onto the next grade, per a government directive.” Adapting to these different learning methods can be a challenge with teachers unfamiliar of how to use them and the varying levels of connectivity that each family has. Some families have a TV, Internet connection, computer, and/or cell phone while others do not. To make this work, it is like a patch-work quilt where everyone is trying their best with the resources they have. 

The three major sources of employment around Tijuana and northern Baja California are factories (particularly technology and medical device manufacturing), construction, and hospitality. It’s been hard to see factories temporarily shut down or drastically reduce workers’ hours due to social distancing efforts. Even more unfortunate is the production of medical devices that Mexico could utilize, but instead is contractually bound to export to other countries. This is an unfortunate by-product of special export zones and other international trade rules. Factory owners, Tijuana government, industry associations, and buyers are all trying to figure out solutions. Restaurants, hotels, and other leisure activities are and will continue to be negatively impacted as people stay home. Overall, families are using up their savings on food and other basic necessities during this time. For those that live paycheck to paycheck, the longer COVID-19 shutdowns and shelter in place orders stay in effect, the harder it will be. The families that Doxa serves in Tijuana typically do not have much or any financial buffer to weather economic disruptions. 

Carmen, assistant director of Hogar de los Niños orphanage, says “COVID-19 has affected us in two major ways, being socially isolated and having more time to share with our kids.” The social isolation aspect can be hard, especially for a culture that is very relational and is accustomed to expression through face-to-face interactions. Greetings by hugs and a little kiss on the cheek used to be common. This adjustment is tough and can take a psychological toll. On the other hand, an unexpected benefit is having more time with the kids at home. Hogar de los Niños is blessed with large spaces to play soccer, basketball, and other activities. Their kitchen and pantry are stocked and there continues to be nutritious food on the table. Carmen shares that “we have watched story time videos, danced, and sang.” All activities directed through a distance program by the Tijuana Cultural Center. Ending on a positive note, Carmen has noticed a decrease in arguments among everyone. 

Maria, founder of Unidos por Siempre orphanage, hasn’t let the news of COVID-19 slow her infectious and vibrant personality. She continues to organize fun activities, like an Easter egg hunt and kid’s day celebration, to keep everyone busy while cooped up at home. Unidos por Siempre has also been vigilant about increasing their cleaning efforts, hand washing, and disinfecting high-traffic areas. For active time, kids make extra use of the play structure and street out front for jump-rope and impromptu soccer games. 

For the Tijuana-San Diego region, COVID-19 has also impacted mobility. The San Diego Sector, with its three land border ports of entry, is one of the busiest in the entire world with an average daily total of 149,445 persons entering the United States (2019 data, US Dept. of Transportation). While the border has remained open for US citizens, permanent residents, and work visa holders, it has been closed to those with tourist visas. This has complicated the life of many people who regularly cross the border for family, personal, or other reasons. 

Update on Doxa’s COVID-19 Response

For the first time in Doxa’s 30-year history, there were no groups in Tijuana building houses this spring. The faithful Spring Break groups that have been a cornerstone in Tijuana house building were noticeably absent. Unfortunately, many other organizations that build houses around Tijuana and northern Baja California also canceled their house building plans. Instead, a handful of organizations (Doxa included) quickly pivoted to raising donations towards the building of houses by locals. Not only can this still be a way to ultimately accomplish the mission of building houses for qualified families, but it has the added benefit of increasing employment opportunities in the region where many may be facing layoffs. 

Doxa’s orphanage partners are also heavily impacted by the absence of groups. Normally, the spring house building season is when they host many volunteers and recognize the income that those groups bring. This income is what helps to sustain their operations year around. In response, Doxa has started a special fund for each orphanage so they can still be supported financially during this time. 

With school classes canceled, various distance learning strategies are being used. For older students, online classes have started and Doxa’s education program quickly shifted to providing laptops and home Internet access to families without those resources. Having kids study from home has been an adjustment for all our families, just as it probably has for yours. The after-school program is temporarily closed until we can safely reopen. We use a mix of WhatsApp and phone calls to check-in with families and attend to student progress.

With the disruption caused by COVID-19, Doxa has taken this as an opportunity to rethink, repurpose, and pivot into new strategies for still accomplishing its mission of house building, education, and community throughout Tijuana. These needs don’t cease just because of the current pandemic. While all of our lives in the short-run have been drastically altered by COVID-19, Doxa remains attentive and perceptive in the ways that COVID-19 may have impacts in the long-run. We hope to be able to use this window of opportunity as a way to ultimately better serve the families of Tijuana. 

Below is an update on fundraising efforts for house building and both orphanage funds. Thank you to everyone who has contributed towards these efforts, we’re making great progress! You can continue to be involved through active prayer, giving, and reaching out to someone you know in the Tijuana community.

Total fundraising in response to COVID-19

Being Helpful: Relief, Rehabilitation, or Development

Our response to poverty and how we carryout poverty alleviation plans matters. We have a desire to help in a productive way, and not enable or make worse someone’s situation in the long-run. How can we do this? 

First, it helps to determine what type of poverty alleviation effort is appropriate: relief, rehabilitation, or development. This classification was pioneered in the best-selling book, When Helping Hurts

  • Relief is characterized by an urgent need that people are incapable of fulfilling themselves typically due to a one-time crisis (think COVID-19 sickness or food shortage). 
  • Rehabilitation occurs when people have recovered their bearings and can start to actively be part of their own solution (think active job searching after unexpected job loss). This continues until they return to pre-crisis conditions. 
  • Development describes the growth that someone has above and beyond their pre-crisis state (think moving into a nicer house due to years of dedicated job growth or being able to provide education opportunities to their children that were unattainable for themselves). Development can take years to materialize and even span generations in the same family. 

Another key distinction between these poverty alleviation strategies is that relief is typically done to someone and rehabilitation and development are done with someone (learn more from The Chalmers Center). 

Within the current context of COVID-19 in Tijuana, Doxa’s response has been a mixture of relief and rehabilitation. Relief efforts have included food distribution to community households, special emergency funding to orphanages, and the provision of face masks. The procurement process for the food and face masks has been rehabilitation as we source these items locally. Partnering with a local farmer, produce vendor, and larger grocery stores to give them all needed business. Repurposing our house curtain maker, Luis, to instead make hundreds of face masks during this time. Additionally, when legally allowed to resume house building, Doxa will be employing local people to build houses. Another example of rehabilitation efforts. 

Even without the challenging times of COVID-19, it can be hard to accurately respond to poverty. For some it evokes an emotional and spiritual reaction and for others an alarming panic and urgency to just do something. If we’re not careful, however, the wrong application can lead to long-term harm. As the situation around COVID-19 further develops and gradually comes to an end, there will be another difficult decision-point on the horizon. When to stop relief efforts before they start to do harm? 

COVID-19 & Call to Action

I hope this message finds you healthy and safe. COVID-19 has turned our world upside down. In short order, our lives have changed and many are experiencing uncertainty, doubt, and anxiety. The full ripple effects of COVID-19 are still unknown, especially as it continues to work its way from region to region around the world. These are unprecedented times indeed. 

The Tijuana-San Diego region used to be extremely mobile, with people regularly traveling internationally. Families, friends, employment, and lives that are truly binational. For a culture that is so highly relational, it is a new challenge for us to reconcile the reality of social distancing and restrictions on gathering. Doxa, along with similar organizations in Tijuana, has temporarily closed its doors. House building by groups, community center gatherings, after-school programs, and related events have all been cancelled or rescheduled. Hopefully these small actions can be part of a larger region-wide effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. 

The impact touches many on both sides of the border: high school youth groups, Hogar de los Niños, Unidos por Siempre, local bodegas, hardware stores, lumber suppliers, and the families that were slated to receive houses. As for Doxa’s staff, we have committed to paying full salaries during this temporary break. Doxa acknowledges these ripple effects and is called into action to help the greater Tijuana community. 

As agents of change in a highly relational ministry, we can still carry out this work even though it may look a little different than we originally planned. Together, we can pivot, repurpose, and still continue to serve the families and partners in Tijuana. Here’s how: 

  • Pray 
    • Our hearts break for the 22 families that were scheduled to receive a house in April. Rosa, Maria, and I are afraid that we’ve blindsided some families, especially with less than a month’s notice that plans needed to change. Many families were already preparing their land. Pray that God would still make a way for each family to receive a house. 
    • Lift up Hogar de los Niños and Unidos por Siempre orphanages, their staffs, and their children. May they continue to be healthy during this time, grow in relationship with each other, and know how loved they are by so many. 
    • For the entire Tijuana-San Diego region, that cooperation and care for one another would win the day. 
  • Donate 
    • With no house building groups coming to build in April, Hogar de los Niños and Unidos por Siempre will see a reduction in expected revenue. By donating, we allow them to keep employing their staff and continue providing children with a home. Some of these funds will also be used to equip high school and college aged students with laptops so they can continue their school year online. 
      • Hogar de los Niños funding goal: $7,500
      • Unidos por Siempre funding goal: $15,000 
    • With the cancelation of house building groups in April, 22 families are now in a tough spot. The good news is that Doxa can still build these homes with local labor. Not only does this provide a solution for 22 families, but also provides local employment opportunities during a time where many will face reductions in pay or layoffs. 
      • Cost per house is $6,438. 
      • Currently, we have 9 of the 22 houses covered! Thank you! 
      • For groups and individuals who contribute towards the building of houses, Doxa is providing more personal and meaningful feedback so some connection can be made even if not in person. 
  • Send a kind and encouraging note to people you know in Tijuana 
    • Many of you have come to serve in Tijuana, either through house building or in another capacity. I would encourage you to utilize Facebook, email, Messenger, WhatsApp, Facetime, or regular phone calls to reach out. Thankfully, there are a number of communication methods at our disposal. 
    • Families all across Tijuana have not forgotten the impact that you’ve made and always appreciate a nice note. It doesn’t have to be long or elaborate, and Google Translate can be of help. Families always enjoy having a touch point from someone who has made a lasting impression on them. 

Thank you for your prayers and support of Doxa, its partners, and the families of Tijuana. I hope that this challenging time can put on display the best of who we are. That we can double-down on kindness, generosity, and exemplifying God’s love. 

Alex Knopes 
Executive Director
alex@doxaserves.org